Monthly Archives: June 2013

Update 23 June 2013

Today will be a simple post of this week’s activities.  There are a couple stories I would like to tell, but I have not taken the time to think them through and write them out.

On Tuesday we will have been here two months already!  This past week we focused on the following:

1)      Language and culture training – learning the basic introductions of the Lugandan language, practicing the language and experiencing places in Jinja and our community.

2)      House work – planning mosquito screens, sealing cracks and cleaning around the 18 windows of the house to cut the amount of critters coming in.  This is a job!

3)      Assisting Michelle and the kids in 3 days of ministry at a women’s conference.  Our three children assisted a church from Arkansas in providing childcare for missionary mothers during the conference.  This fit really well with our three kids.  Michelle watched kids the first day, too, but joined the conference the second and third day.

4)      Equip Uganda policies and procedures – I (Mark) am writing proposed policies for our NGO (non-government organization, i.e. Equip).

5)      Immigration items – pulling together items I need for my work permit request.

This afternoon we hosted 8 singles (four of those are interns from the States), three families (with a total of 12 kids) and our bunch of 9 for a house Bible study, which I led.  Michelle and I both enjoyed having these folks in our home and fellowshipping with them.  We rotate homes for the weekly Bible study.  And yes, I did write our “9.”  Our family has doubled from five members to nine – twelve on weekends, depending on how you count them.  I will write more about this in the future and introduce these folks to you then.

This week looks very similar to last week, with immigration and mosquito screens moving to a higher priority of things to do.

Mark with a bunch of Matooke (cooking bananas)

Mark with a bunch of Matooke (cooking bananas)

The picture is a photo of Matooke (pronounced mah toe kee, which are cooking bananas).  The consistency when cooked is like thick mashed potatoes, but turn out yellow when cooked.  Matooke is served with peanut (ground nut) sauce.  We also had rice, and green beans, but at the last minute Ruth changed the green beans out for a cabbage and pea mixture that tastes like something cooked at a Japanese restaurant.  Very delicious.  This entire bunch was purchased for about 12,000 Ugandan Shillings or $4.60 US dollars.  We ate less than one fourth of them Saturday night.

Josh did not like bananas before moving here, but now he eats bananas, and he “loves” matooke.

Advertisements
Aside

A friend of mine shared a song, “Clear the Stage” with me today. It seems to go along with the post, “Do You Ever Want More?” so I added the song link at the end of the post. Great song, … Continue reading

Do You Ever Want More?

Wheat "White" for Harvest

Wheat “White” for Harvest
Photo by Ferrell Jenkins used according to Permission Rights.

Really, do you in all honesty, fact and sincerity want more?

You might ask, more of what?  More time?  More motivation?  More satisfaction?  More strength?  More happiness?  More money?  More from your spouse, friends or kids?

On Monday, Luke Anderson (an Equip teammate) and I went to Kampala.  He was showing me where the immigration offices were and he was picking up a document from there.  As he was waiting in line, I was reading the first chapter of Counterfeit Gods by Tim Keller.  The words provoked me, and caused me to think about having more – more insight and ability to see spiritually like Jesus did.  Had that desire become an idol, secondary to intimacy with Jesus?  It seems so.

The white bus with a blue stripe is similar to the bus Luke and I travelled in from Jinja to Kampala.

As we had wrapped up our business at immigration and were traveling home in the bus, I was sitting next to a window near the back of the bus.  I was still pondering what I had read.  Why could I not see the mission field as “white with harvest” as Jesus could?  I mean, really.  Jesus seemed to see fields ready for harvest – he saw “white.”  I am more likely to see fields bare, hot with sun, lacking rain and possibly ready for planting or waiting for growth.  I see needs, but I do not see desire.  Apparently I don’t have the eyes to see desire or hunger for God.

Later, as I pondered these things near the back of the bus that was returning to Jinja, a girl probably in her 20’s was sleeping in the seat directly in front of me.  She jolted me from deep thought with rapid outbursts of loud and dramatic screams.  At first I thought the bus was about to wreck.  All attention in the bus quickly turned to her.  The man next to this girl leaned away from her and moved away a few inches in fear, while the man in front of her got up out of his seat and turned around.  Not sure what to do I leaned forward, began praying and touched the girl on the back, lightly consoling her.  By this time the man in front of this girl had asked to switch places with the man beside the girl.  The man beside the girl did not hesitate for a second, looking for any opportunity to separate himself from the unknown.  He quickly exchanged places, moving forward to the other seat.

The man moving from in front of the girl showed signs of age and maturity, with a small splotch of gray in his hair near his sideburns.  He was probably in his 50’s.  As he climbed over his seat and moved one row back, he looked at me and verbally expressed appreciation.  I could see in his expression that this was not the first time something like this had happened.  He knew what to do and quickly took his new seat to the girl’s right and wrapped his left arm around and behind the girl.  Since I was behind her, I placed my right hand on her head and gently stroked her tightly cropped hair.  She very slowly laid her head back awkwardly against the top of her seat while turning her head over her left shoulder.  As her face came into view I could see thick, white and clear sputum dripping from her mouth.  While she had stopped screaming, her eyes were crossed as she slowly looked back at me.

Our eyes connected only briefly.  The man who was holding her to her right quickly reached with his right hand across her face and brushed her eyelids closed.  The look in this girl’s eyes reminds me now as I write, of the barrenness of her field.  Her outburst stirred compassion and questions within me.  How long had this girl and this man endured the pain and embarrassment of this affliction?  Was the outburst a result of a seizure?  Was it the result of a witchdoctor?  Was it due to cerebral malaria?  Was it a result of abuse?  Had this man taken this girl to a witchdoctor for help?  Had he sought help from numerous church leaders to pray for healing or cast out demons?  How often did this happen?

These questions still remain.  I wasn’t sure how to respond and the bus was noisy.  I didn’t want to bring more attention to the girl and she seemed to need to sleep, which eventually came to her.  So I did not follow up in conversation with the man.  And he did not turn and seek conversation with me, or anyone else for that matter.  People were eerily quiet while the noises of the bus, its radio and the noisy sounds of travel in Uganda were heard.  People seemed to fear another jolt of the unexpected.

As we continued our journey down the dusty road between Kampala and Jinja, people occasionally glanced back at the girl to see how she was behaving, if she was OK and look for signs of another outburst.  It did not happen.

I was left questioning.  Was that a “white” field ready for harvest?  If it was, what should I have done?  And why did this man not ask or seek?  Was he weary from seeking help?  Perhaps he had come to the place of acceptance with this burden.

Have we come to the place of acceptance with our burdens?  With our struggles?  With our sin?  With our, “I’ve blown it again” thoughts?  With the mundane?  With the barren fields?  With things as they are?  What is God up to?

Full moon occurs at every Passover (usually in March or April).

A full moon occurs at every Passover
(usually in March or April).

At a very quiet and intimate time in the life of Jesus and his followers, the betrayer restless with Jesus not doing more about bringing his kingdom to the earth and overthrowing the wicked Romans, left the sweet fellowship of Jesus to do his dastardly deed.  As Jesus’ life was drawing to a close the full moon cast light into the darkness.  Similarly the Rabbi teacher shed a glimmer of revelation into the dark mysteries of intimacy and closeness with Him, “If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you.”

Oh, do you not long for that day – to ask of the Master, and then to receive?  I wonder how much anticipation the older man and girl in the bus have for this day, “to ask for release of their burden” and to receive.

Abide.  The word means to remain; wait for; tarry; be prepared for; watch; bear patiently; tolerate; remain stable or fixed in some state or condition.

As I write, Michelle just finished up today’s women’s Bible study.  She has no idea of the subject I am writing, and she was telling me her study today was on God’s timing.  The lesson she received was, “We wait on the Lord – that is where our strength is.”  She continued, “Waiting on an event or a person depletes us.”

What does that mean?  Deplete means to “empty or unload; use up resources; consume vital powers of; exhaust.” Webster’s 1913 dictionary gives a graphic illustration of the word, to empty by (the old fashioned medical procedure of) bloodletting.  Loss of blood literally and figuratively drains a person of their strength. Fresh blood, on the other hand, brings strength to a person.  I witnessed that truth first hand at Hospice when patients would receive a blood transfusion – their strength and vitality; their life would return.

When we cast our sins on Jesus through confession and repentance, the blood of Jesus cleanses and brings life, strength and vitality to us.  We abide, waiting not for some event to happen, but abide in getting to know Jesus.  How long did Jesus wait before His Father said, “Go!”?  How long do we wait for His return?  Waiting brings strength – strength from our quiet time; strength from learning patience; strength from knowing the passion, waiting and suffering of our Savior, the Christ.  The relationship with Him is the most important, for that relationship will last for an eternity.  So do you want more things to go your way?  More events to happen soon?  More people to live and do things the way you want them?  Or do you want more of Jesus?

If you want more of Him, simply ask.  As you wait on Him, He promises that He will give you what you desire. 

Update 2013 June 9

Update about what’s happening with us, but first just a note to say it’s amazing to see how my experience has led up to this job here in Uganda.  I will be working on developing policies and procedures and a handbook for volunteers and new missionaries who arrive on the field with Equip.  I was told by Jeremy and Chris at our first Equip Uganda leadership meeting that my job had changed from 80% ministry / 20 % admin to 80% admin / 20% ministry.

Although a bit disappointing, this is entirely necessary for the stage of growth that Equip Uganda is in.  I look forward to assisting our team in getting Equip Uganda started.  We’re working on mission statement, vision statement, purpose statement and other admin things that will better develop the direction for the organization in years to come.

One of the biggest challenges we face is coordination with other NGO’s (non-government organizations).  We hope to set up some coordinated efforts to make ministry in Jinja, and specifically Masese slum more efficient, with better communication.

Now on to our week this past week:
Tuesday, June 4th we move into the Sperlings home, about 5 miles or so east of Jinja.  We spent most of the day settling, organizing and cleaning our stuff.

Wednesday, June 5th – 1st day of formal Luganda Language training.  Wow!  We purchased a Learning Luganda CD in late 2012 from Amazon and have been going through

it.  The kids are doing great and the parents…not so bad.  The CD has some mistakes, we’re finding out.  The CD says “please” in Luganda is embwa.  However, embwa means “dog.”  So you can imagine why our restaurant server looked at us funny when we thought we said, “Please” and we really said, “dog.”  Not good.

Also on Wednesday we had a couple items to take care of with the house – the most

 
A snapshot of Main Street, downtown Jinja.

important was to get a quote to install mosquito screens for the windows in the house, in A snapshot of Main Street, downtown Jinja.order to cut down on malaria.  Finally I begin driving in Uganda!  This is insanity – driving on the opposite side of the road and the drivers seat, gear shift, rear view mirror, radio, signal lights, etc. etc. all opposite.  The only thing that remains the same, thankfully is that the gas is on the right foot and clutch on the left foot.  Oh, and backing the vehicle is opposite, too.  Pedestrians have no rights and yet they will walk in the road.  Vehicles stop in the road.  Botas (small motorcycles) drive the wrong way on the road.  Traffic drives in the evening with no lights on or their high beams on.  Stop signs are disregarded by everybody.  No such thing as lanes – if you can squeeze by, then do it no matter where you are on the road!  Speed in reality is somewhat regulated by using potholes to slow traffic.  They will use speed bumps, too.  You really take your life in your hands.  I haven’t prayed like this before when driving – seriously.

Thursday was men’s group and meeting with teammate Jeremy for our monthly Equip team meeting on Friday morning.  More driving!  We also shopped in town for basic necessities around the house – remember we’re somewhat starting over again.

Friday – Equip Uganda monthly meeting discussing past months activities, future plans, better coordination of activities, communication, financial reporting, mission, vision, purpose, etc.  2nd quote on the mosquito screens since the first quote was so high.  Passport photos for new drivers permit.  Repaired some minor things Friday evening around the house.  Paid the water bill.  Got groceries.  All this stuff takes extra time due to things like language, not knowing the area, new money, new culture, etc. etc.  A number of times I feel like I’m being cheated.  I was charged $25,000 shillings (about $10) to repair a zipper on my suitcase from the trip here, when I found out I really should have paid only about $5,000 shillings.  The guy charged me higher because they assume because I’m white I have money – in the US some people consider that racism.  Here, discrimination is part of life.

Saturday – personal time. Michelle meets with a fellow missionary wife.  Mark takes care of some personal business.

Sunday – FB a request from a supporting church to provide information about missionaries (that church has VBS this week).  Attend our church in the morning.  Lunch at our house with one of our Equip teammates.  Bible study at another missionary home at 3 pm – meet new interns from the States;  Michelle and girls attend a missionary appreciation dinner at 6 pm for females (moms and wives), while I write our blogs.  It’s 12 midnight.  I’ve got to get to bed!

Monday morning 8:30 am – ride with Luke and others to Kampala (3 hours away) to get my drivers permit and learn about immigration while there, since I will have to apply for a work permit in July.

This past week has more to do with settling into the house and culture than most anything else.  Thanks for prayers!  They mean more than you know!

Learning the Importance of Engaging Others

On Monday, June 3rd at about 6:00 pm local time, I was approached on Main street in Jinja by Abraham, a twelve-year old local boy who saw our family of mzungus (white people) leaving a restaurant.  I was in a rush to get back to the Guest House to be with my family, yet this young guy caught my attention briefly by mumbling, “I wahnt sahma fuhd.”  Due to his thick Ugandan accent I had to ask him what he said.  He repeated the request which I understood this time, but he would not look me in the eye, “I want some food.”

Abraham did not look like a street kid – he was healthy-looking, dressed well, and knew where the street kid ministries were located that could help him.  He was unfortunately learning how to get what he wanted from the mzungus.

This is not the only time I have been asked for food or money since arriving here in Jinja.  I’m not complaining, it’s just caused some thought.  I was asked by two different parents to help them sponsor their children in school since school fees here are expensive and many families have numerous children.

Being in Jinja for just over a month now, I already see the power of money in a third world country.  The easiest, quickest response is money, and we’ve done that too.  Everyone wants just “a little bit more.”  And don’t we as Americans have relatively a lot of it?

So how are we to handle requests for money and food, especially when so many programs exist to help?

It’s interesting that there is an example in Scripture about money that leads us to what I think part of the answer is to this dilemma.  At first glance, the story may not seem to connect with this blog, but think about it more deeply.

MoneyIn Matthew 22, the story is recorded.  The Pharisees ask Jesus:  17Tell us, therefore, what do You think? Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not?”

  18But Jesus perceived their wickedness, and said, “Why do you test Me, you hypocrites?   19Show Me the tax money.”

So they brought Him a denarius.

  20And He said to them, “Whose image and inscription is this?”

  21They said to Him, “Caesar’s.”

And He said to them, “Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.”

Brilliant answer.

The well-known Christian apologist, Ravi Zacharias in discussing this section of Scripture thinks that the Pharisees missed a great follow up question, which in his opinion they should have asked Jesus.  That question being, “And what belongs to God?”

Ravi thinks Jesus’ answer to this hypothetical question would have been something like, “Whose image is on you?”

On us?  Is there an image and an inscription on us?  According to Genesis 1:27 man is made in the image of God.  God’s image is on us!  So we belong to God – his workmanship and creation.  What about an inscription?  Incredibly Isaiah 49:15-16 tells us this truth, “Can a woman forget her nursing child, And not have compassion on the son of her womb?Hand & Cross Surely they may forget, Yet I will not forget you. See, I have inscribed (Heb root is to hack; implying to enact like laws written on stone) you on the palms of My hands;”

How much we matter to God, if we just stop for a while and consider!  He desires a strong relationship!  So much that He didn’t just throw money at us, but rather He cares for us more than a nursing mother does her child.  He took the inscription of our sins onto His palms through the nails that held Him to the cross.

I am learning this point:  relationships matter and we must make the time to engage people in our busy world and not just hand out money.  Love people – that should include engaging them while feeding them or helping them and tell them the Gospel reason why we are helping them.  Should we feed or give money in all cases?  I believe we should follow the lead of God’s Holy Spirit.  An important question might be:  Does handing generous sums of money out, bring those in need to depend on further begging or depend on Jesus?

Little Abraham had engaged me – whether for legitimate reasons or not, I do not know.  As Abraham and I were talking, I thought about Abraham’s request for food.  He knew the ministries where he could get food.  I did sense the Spirit asking me to engage him and we talked about real bread – the Bread of Life being Jesus.  I trust this was the appropriate response in this situation.  It has also reminded me of the importance of my quiet time in order to be prepared to face who God is leading to me that day.

Of Truth & Death

Today’s blog will differ in writing style from previous blogs.  I divert to address a reality we all must eventually face.  As such, the topic is of tremendous importance.

Over the last couple weeks I have been faced with the reality of death:

1) With Samuel’s father (I wrote recently of his murder here in Uganda).

2) Just this past week my 86-year old grandmother, Beulah Wise, died.

3) In a Facebook chat recently with a childhood friend of mine, he shared his experience of the death of his close and intimate friend.  The death had a deep and dramatic impact on my childhood friend, even resulting in depression, numerous gravesite visits, hospitalization, a break-down, counseling and medication.

4) The subject of death indirectly arose in the last couple weeks with a 30-something year-old young man (who admitted he has left Christianity for further enlightenment and spirituality).  He stayed with us for about two weeks at the house where we resided here in Jinja during the month of May.  I deeply desired to hear more of his thoughts and how he constructed his beliefs.

5) The reality of death came up in my quiet time yesterday and then again, today during our pastor’s sermon at church this morning.

Additionally, most of my friends and family know that I worked in Hospice care for 15 years, surrounded by stories and the reality of death.  That reality of death and watching how different people responded to it has intrigued me and caused me to reflect on what happens after death.

From my childhood, up until I was in my 30’s I was taught from the Bible that death is a “sleep.”  This meant, as I was told on numerous occasions with Biblical references and as I understood it, the person was not consciously aware of their surroundings when they are dead.  Then, later when Jesus returned, there would be a resurrection of the saints.  That belief was similar to what Jehovah Witnesses believe about death.  I recognize Biblical elements in that belief, but also am aware of some of the inadequacies of those beliefs.

One fact I remember about my grandmother was her continual longing to depart to “be with Christ” – something the apostle Paul referenced in the book of Philippians, chapter 1.  She vocalized to me a number of times the fact that she could not understand why my grandfather died first and why the Lord kept her here as long as He had.  She also communicated on numerous occasions that she was “ready to go.”  She had a confidence about her death and did not fear it – similar to the apostles.

This I admired, since by contrast, as I matured, I feared death.  I was not confident in the final decision Jesus would make about my life.  I was not assured of salvation.

It is not the purpose of this blog to analyze or attempt to argue about my beliefs.  My desire in this blog is to think reasonably and Biblically in forming an understanding of death (not just what people think about it) and present what I understand here in this blog.  I am more confident about some of my views about death now because my beliefs are rooted in certain Biblical truths, but I certainly do not claim to have “total truth” about death.

For any topic, especially one as serious as death, one must seek truth – not what one desires to believe, or wants to believe, or what other people believe, or the popular opinion of the time.  But rather what is real, not fiction or myth.

One of the positives of death is that it causes us to question life, destiny and purpose.  I would hope that questioning would cause us to discover truth in life.

Truth by definition is “that which is in accordance with reality or fact; not fiction; genuine; actual; proven; reliable; trusted.”

The first truth I am confident of is that Jesus is the life.  If there is anyone I am going to “bank on” or “invest in,” “follow,” or “bet on” (pick your metaphor) for life, it is Jesus.  Other religions and religious leaders fail miserably in making the promises that are recorded about Jesus.  He performed many miracles that resulted in improving life and at least two miracles where he resurrected dead people.  No other religious leader behaved like He did, loved like He did, nor made claims like He did, backing up those claims with “many infallible proofs.”  One of His closest followers even claimed Jesus said He was the Truth and the Life.  He not only alleviated suffering, but He set an example of how to persevere in life through suffering.  He is called a “man of sorrows” and “acquainted with grief.”  When I suffer, He understands, and to a limited extent I experience what He experienced.  He claimed to be God and He allowed people to worship Him.   He is controversial.  Many people have written of Jesus, perhaps more than any other religious leader.  At least 500 people personally witnessed Him after His resurrection.   Controversy and religious conflict and failure does not shake my confidence in Jesus.  When He says to Mary, “I am the resurrection and the life” I think these statements are such critically important statements that they deserve attention and research.  Speaking of Mary, Jesus respected and esteemed women and other cultures, which was very controversial to do in His day.  If people argue against Jesus, they usually do so by striking at the people who wrote about Him or the people who follow Him.  While there may currently be no archeological discoveries which point to a real life Jesus, I am reminded that one of the criticisms of the Biblical Pontius Pilate was the same – no archeological proof of Pilate’s existence, until a coin was discovered in 1961 with his name on it.  My desire is to follow the One who made a claim of conquering death.  That is Jesus.  Finally, one of the primary reasons I am convinced Jesus is real is because He has revealed Himself to me and my family personally.  You be the judge as to whether you think the changes have been for good.

The second truth I am confident of is that the Bible is God’s inspired word given through men.  The last (New Testament) writers of the Bible make fantastic claims about Jesus.  At least two or three of those writers were radical skeptics who remained committed to Jesus to the end of their lives.  The Bible is unique to other religious books – it has unity in diversity.  It respects people from all walks of life (thereby better reflecting the diversity in creation than any other religious book that I am aware of).  The Bible contains an amazing message.  It elevates God first, and then elevates man by stating in the beginning, man is created in the image of God.  Man fails.  God, not man, makes a way back for man.  Consider also that books of the Bible were written by people from all walks of life – shepherds, a farmer, priests, kings, a physician, fishermen, and others over a long period of time (about 1500 years), some well educated, others un-educated.  Although very hard on its skeptics, the Bible does invite and elevate those skeptics at times when they turn in favor of its God and its teachings.  It holds no single person as the ultimate, perfect person and sole source for truth other than the person of Jesus, who claimed to be God.  We see in its pages, numerous successes and failures of its followers – simply stated, we see life at its best and worst.  We see fantastic grace and mercy extended to humans in all sorts of situations and it addresses a vast array of topics.  We have warnings.  We have judgments.  We have truth.  We see fulfilled prophecies – hundreds of them.  It is written literally, historically, figuratively, poetically and dramatically.  The Bible is more resilient than any other literary work.  Over hundreds of years it has not lost its message, keeping words the same.  Men and women have died for what they believed about it.  Lives have been radically changed.  It has gone into the world like no other book in the world.  It has been translated into almost all the languages in the world.  Its message is living, breathing and sharper than any sword, convicting and changing many failures and even successes.  The Bible helps provide rational, reasonable and logical answers to critical questions of life – origin, purpose, destiny and morality.

Thus the reason for my blog.  The following is not an exhaustive explanation of death in the Bible.  It is very limited, but addresses key concepts important to my understanding of death.  Since Bible writers under the inspiration of God make claims that Jesus is the Life, has overcome death and is resurrected, I can trust the Bible to tell me what happens after death:

1)      My body perishes (1 Cor 15:53).  This is quite obvious and we do not need the Bible to tell us this fact.  However, in discussing the subject of death, we find that at least two Bible writers (Paul and Peter) claim that the body (both refer to the body metaphorically as a “tent”) is “put off” (see 1 Cor 5:1-9; 2 Peter 1:14-15) when we die.

2)      But we have a “house (contrasted with a temporary tent) not made with hands, eternal in the heavens” – something more solid, more permanent (1 Cor 5:1).  Jesus said He was going to prepare a place for us (John 14:3).

3)      The Bible reconciles both the future bodily resurrection (1 Cor 15) with the move of the believer (some call it a believer’s spirit, some call it a believer’s soul) into the presence of Jesus.  Jesus, after all, will return with ten thousands of His saints (Jude 1:14).  Soul is defined for purposes here as one’s “mind (thoughts), will and emotions.”

4)      After death, the saints will be with Jesus, Paul states in 1 Thes 5:10 that, “whether we wake (live physically) or sleep (die), we should live together with Him.”  That is, whether living physically or dead, we’re with Jesus.  Paul also equates being absent from the body to being present with the Lord in 2 Cor 5:8.  Paul also states in Phil 1:23 that he would rather “depart to be with Jesus.”  Jesus states, “that where I am, you may be also” (John 14:3).  Peter describes it this way, that shortly he will “put off his tent” implying like Paul that he too will move to a permanent, eternal house not made with hands (2 Pet 1:14).

5)      Those who are not believers and followers of Jesus will not be with Jesus.  Jesus and His followers were very clear about this.  After one of the most well known verses in the Bible (John 3:16) where John describes the love of God through Jesus and offers hope of not perishing by accepting Jesus, John then writes the following “He who believes in (Jesus) is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. 19And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. 20For everyone practicing evil hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his deeds should be exposed.” (John 3:18-20).  The Bible and Jesus have much to say about this.

Whether you agree or not, I encourage you to seek Truth.  Truth provides the solid foundation for our beliefs.  Jesus illustrated His teachings this way, 24“Therefore whoever hears these sayings of Mine, and does them, I will liken him to a wise man who built his house on the rock: 25and the rain descended, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house; and it did not fall, for it was founded on the rock.
26“But everyone who hears these sayings of Mine, and does not do them, will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand: 27and the rain descended, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house; and it fell. And great was its fall.”
(Matt 7:24 – 27)