Category Archives: Updates

Michelle Saves a Toddler From the Middle of a Busy Highway!

As mentioned in the previous blog, tragedy happens often here in Uganda.  Today as Michelle and I traveled to Jinja on a 4-lane highway with traffic going about 50 – 55 mph, a toddler was crossing the two lanes of traffic ahead of us – in the middle of the two lanes!!  I saw the kid first with both hands extended in the air to balance herself.  I started blowing the horn – no response.  Michelle asked, “Is that a baby in the road?”

This road is similar to the one from which Michelle rescued the toddler.  There is normally quite a bit of traffic on it.

This is the road from which Michelle rescued the toddler, although at a different location. There is normally quite a bit of traffic on it.

Our hearts were pounding!  Fear gripped us as I considered the gravity of situation and whether we would witness an horrific accident and a gruesome death.  Praise God no traffic was behind us.  As I stopped in the fast lane, Michelle unbuckled and jumped out of her seat even before I fully stopped, and  onto the highway, risking her own life.  I continuously glanced from the baby, to Michelle and to my rear view mirror, as Michelle swept the toddler off her feet and carried her to safety.  Now rescued, I could pull our vehicle off the road to safety.

My heart was pounding!  Michelle searched for the mother, who was at a nearby landscaping market, shopping and chatting with the owner, oblivious to the horrendous situation that could potentially have unfolded.  Praise God we were there.  A man on a boda (motorcycle) driving the wrong way on the road, began chastising the mother.  There’s irony there.

Praise God for His Grace Shown in Jesus Christ.

Praise God for His Grace Shown in Jesus Christ!!!

God’s grace covers our own daily neglect of our responsibilities.  We should be focused on our struggling spiritual life, but we are too often busy and involved in the day-to-day transactions of the world to even notice or take care.  Often God graciously swoops in through a kind act of mercy and covers us, rescuing us from the dangers of sin.

Michelle and I both came close to crying.  We have not experienced such a potential for disaster, and it stayed with us for miles down the road.  We just praise God for His grace and protection, allowing us to rescue a baby who might have been killed.

 

Advertisements

The Power of God is His Heart

The last few weeks I received invitations to speak at various churches in the area.  Today, I spoke at Samuel’s church, giving a message entitled, “The Power of God is His Heart” (Luke 7:11-17).  Samuel is the young man I have discipled for months.  This afternoon I created a small video of our visit – it’s not much, but hopefully will provide just a small taste of our visit.  Here’s the link:

Last week we visited Church on the Rock in Mfumbira.

On Saturday (March 29th) at Michelle’s Bible study in Masese, she was hit by a small rock while she was teaching.  The rock was thrown by some children and hit her in the chest.  It wasn’t bad, but she immediately recognized the influence of the enemy and rebuked the evil.  After the Bible study a lady asked Michelle to receive Jesus as her Savior.  Michelle prayed with her, and recognized what had happened – the resistance and influence of the enemy.

Sadly far greater tragedy happens in Uganda than being hit by a rock.  We hear of tragedies regularly here, far more often than we heard of tragedy in our community in the United States.  Some of these tragedies I only share generally, avoiding details on this public forum out of respect for the families.

Recently we’ve heard of the death of a father of some children our kids spent time with.  This man was killed after returning from work on his bicycle at night.  The children have no parents now.

We also learned of the tragic and despicable rape of 6-year old girl by a young adult male.  We visited the girl in the hospital and she was full of the Holy Spirit, smiling, singing songs about Jesus and asking to pray for others who were in the hospital.

After a four-day hunt, a large one-ton crocodile was finally caught within walking distance of where we live.  The croc was estimated at more than eighty years old and had eaten four people (mostly fishermen) and maimed others.  You can see the story here:

Man-Eating Croc Captured

One of those maimed by the massive crocodile was a worker for a local missionary friend of ours.  After not showing up to work for some time, the maimed man’s neighbor later admitted to killing the maimed man to send his body parts to a local witch doctor.  This murder leaves two children without parents now.

Pain, suffering, poverty and oppression are a way of life in Uganda, maybe more so than other countries.  But in the midst of affliction, pain and suffering I am reminded of Lamentations 3:32-33 where the Holy Spirit inspires “the weeping prophet” who was watching the brutal collapse and captivity of his nation to write, “Though (the Lord) causes grief, yet He will show compassion, according to the multitude of His mercies.  For He does not afflict willingly (the Hebrew word there literally means, “from His heart.”)…”

Did you catch that?  The real, true God, from His heart is compassionate.  If you hear people talk about God’s judgment, they may very well be speaking truth.  Because God does judge sin justly, but patiently.  Patiently because at His heart is compassion, mercy and love.  If we don’t know God’s heart, then we really don’t know God, do we?  “Through the Lord’s mercies we are not consumed, because His compassions fail not.  They are renewed every morning; Great is Your faithfulness.  Therefore I have hope in Him!  ” (Lam 3:22-24)  Knowing God’s mercy and love is not just recognizing a beautiful sunrise in the morning – that’s only knowing the Creator.  It’s a good start, but does that save anyone?  Do we know God as Savior in the midst of suffering, pain, oppression and poverty?  Jesus said, “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven.”

If you don’t know God, Lamentations tells us we can know Him. “The Lord is good to those who wait for Him, to the soul who seeks Him” (Lam 3:25).  Trust Jesus – He’s at the heart of God – compassionate, kind, merciful and full of grace and love.  If you have questions, please ask.  If you don’t get satisfying answers, pray and keep looking.  Personally, I looked for years, and the answers finally came.  While I was in the midst of that time, I wondered.  Keep your heart open and seek earnestly with a teachable attitude.  You will find the real and one, true God.  May we know His heart.

Update From Week of March 2nd 2014

This past week started off with laughs and tears, and included hitting a motorcycle.

Last Sunday we stayed home due to sickness, but recovered rather quickly.  Samuel texted me last Sunday night asking what Romans 8:28 meant.  He has been through so much.  I responded with something like, “Wow, that’s a big topic, can we talk Monday at 10 am?”  He agreed and it was a fantastic time.  I fully expected and planned to do a lot of listening, but Samuel was hungry.  He was asking questions.

What’s so incredible is that for the past two to three months I have been going through studies and giving messages on suffering.  As I covered with him the Scriptures which I had been studying, he devoured them.  He highlighted them, asked questions, texted me later asking me to remind him of a reference for a particular one.  That part of the conversation ended with Shane and Shane’s, Though You Slay Me video.

Did you know many Ugandans can spend a lot of time in prayer and fasting?  It is the Christian culture here to spend Friday nights at church in all night prayer services.  Christians can pray or fast for hours beyond that.  We as Americans tend to look at all this spiritual “work” and point to little physical results – no house, little clothing, no vehicle, living in a third world country, not improving themselves to American standards – but we’re missing something.  I tell you the truth, I think suffering has enlightened him more to God than me or most American Christians I know.  He better understands suffering.  He doesn’t like it, but he better understands it.

So the time with Samuel included laughs and tears.  He said he was encouraged and sensed the Spirit.  For that I praise God.  I am now meeting with him regularly to see where God will open up a job.  Our next meeting is Wednesday.  We both would appreciate your prayers for him and a job, especially as a single dad.

Other highlights of this week included our worker Ruth getting glasses, the college ministry, Michelle’s Bible studies (she held three this week), lunch with Tommy and Sandra Boone (our Equip teammate’s parents who are visiting), looking to diagnose another noise on our vehicle, and yes, hitting a boda (motorcycle with a driver and passenger that pulled out in front of me from behind a taxi without looking).

Both riders of the boda are fine.  Long story, but an accident with two tractor trailers in a ‘round-about caused traffic to go the wrong way in the ‘round-about.  We saw the accident, entered the ‘round-about the correct way, kept left, slowed down (all with absolutely nobody directing traffic) and the boda darted from behind the taxi without looking!  I was so mad at the guy, even blurted out a yell at him, “What are you doing?!!!”  [Wonderful missionary example].  Michelle screamed, then immediately cried.  Our vehicle lightly tagged the boda – enough to knock it over.  It slightly scratched the front passenger side (remember the driver sits in the car on the right) below the plastic of the bumper.  The passenger was able to jump off and land on his feet safely.  The boda driver couldn’t have been more than just a few years out of school and there’s no training for them.  Both riders walked away and seemed fine.  The driver was apologetic to me.  I bet he won’t dart out from behind a vehicle without looking any time soon.  Josh, who was in the back with Brittany, said a few minutes later his legs were still shaking from the ordeal.  Praise God it wasn’t anything more serious.  Your prayers are appreciated and important!

Finally, I spoke at Bugembe this morning.  I appreciate pastor Jabel and his wife, Janet, inviting us there so the church could pray for the girls before they leave for the States.  The church service went Bugembe Mark 2to 2:20 pm.  I spoke about 45 minutes.  We had the countries of Uganda, Canada, Austria, Switzerland and the US represented, along with a man from Tennessee who spoke, as well.  The church is also trying to raise $300 US to reinforce the wooden poles that termites are eating.  The church building is actually leaning and could collapse in the near future if something is not done.

At the service the girls received a word of knowledge / prophecy from the lady from Austria, who told them that fear was an issue, but encouraged them to believe that God has all things in control.  She gave a picture illustration of what she saw in the Spirit during the prayer time.  It was encouraging to hear and the Shofarword she gave the girls addressed the very issues we’ve been facing.  As a symbol of the victory that the girls have in Christ, she blew a shofar (Jewish ram’s horn – see photo, although her shofar was turned a bit and longer).  That was a first for us, but a nice picture of the reality of God’s promises.

 Monday is a trip to Kampala for Equip Uganda.  Another busy week coming up, but we love it!

Missions Is More Than Giving Up McDonald’s

Daniel

Daniel – an elder at Acacia Community Church; a man with a servant’s heart.

Sobering news came this week when an elder (Daniel) in our church here in Jinja and a church leader and speaker (Andrew) were traveling north in Uganda.  Police arrested and beat them.  Andrew and Daniel spoke briefly at church today.  Andrew still has a limp.  He sat during worship songs today and will be seeing a doctor about possible spine damage tomorrow morning.  Both men are married and love Jesus.

These two Christians were arrested by police or military for being thieves, beaten badly, their money and belongings (including their shoes) stolen, and thrown into jail.  One of our Ugandan brothers described the jail cell as a “closet a person would not want to spend one minute in” where other inmates were standing and urine was on the floor.

Our pastor, Terry Nester, reminded the Jinja congregation, many of us missionaries, that sometimes we joke about suffering in Uganda by missing out on McDonald’s or other conveniences and material things.  But when something like this happens with its pain, suffering and tears, it is a sobering reminder that men are evil, the powers of darkness are real, and we don’t play with Barbie dolls on the battlefield.

When Daniel and Andrew were in jail, they shared with fellow inmates that they were not thieves, but preachers of the Gospel.  Ironically Andrew was to start a new sermon series in our church’s early service (a church in Luganda language) on the book of Philippians, which has the theme of joy during suffering (Paul was a prisoner when he wrote the letter).

Please pray for Daniel and Andrew – that they and their families would heal from this physically and mentally abusive situation; for their tormenters that they would come to know Christ; and for good to come from this, even that Jesus is glorified.

On a bit lighter note, this past week Equip Uganda sponsored a training conference for Ugandan pastors about HIV, called HIV Hope.  The one-week conference was held on the outskirts of Kampala at Enid’s place (Enid is an Equip Uganda national missionary worker) and about twenty pastors attended.

Before the event even started Equip leadership received communication that two separate individuals (Ugandans) communicated two separate dreams about the good God would be doing at this conference.  Being from the west, we’re cautious about dreams, but we’re so happy to report the event was a GREAT success and we apparently received a prophetic word before hand.

Jeremy Boone related to me that by the end of the week the pastors were such a strong, unified team.  Someone had communicated to him at the end of the conference that they were not looking forward to the conference, but during the week very much enjoyed it!  The mood was very upbeat and hopeful!  A letter of sincere thanks was written to Duane, the conference speaker.  I hope to share some more information in the future, maybe even pictures.  We praise God for what He did through Duane, Enid and Enid’s family, Jeremy, Luke and the others.  If you prayed, thank you so very much!  Praise God.

Missions (whether overseas or across the street) should always get us past the frivolous like missing McDonald’s and to the real – whether suffering at the hands and batons of abusers or whether understanding the realities of life like HIV disease and placing our hope in a Savior who loves us and taught us how to suffer and still trust God.

HIV Hope at Community Care

IMG_6457

Equip Uganda Team Members: Enid (front row, left), Luke Anderson (in back with cap) and Wise Family

One of our Equip Uganda teammates, Enid (see photo, in front on far left), is a well-respected medical leader in her local community just outside Kampala.  She specializes in HIV care, treatment and education.  Our family visited Enid’s home and clinic on Friday and Saturday.   Enid is a strong widowed mother with three children (Isaac, Psalms, and Victory) who cares for twin girls who are two.  The twins’ mother died during childbirth, the father would not care for them, so Enid took the twins into her home.

Enid can be contacted 24-hours a day.  In fact, Friday night after a delicious dinner, some conversation and at her request some prayer, she was called out to the clinic.  We found out the next morning.  It’s about a half mile from her house, and she walked to it at night with her son.  This was a good night as she was able to return to her house by about 10 pm.

On her land Enid has a house (see the photo, her home is to the right of the parked vehicle we’re IMG_6458driving), a building for guests to stay overnight (not pictured, but to the extreme right), outdoor latrines (not pictured, but to the extreme left), and a building (to the left of the vehicle) that serves as a nice room for educational conferences, meals and/or a sanctuary. Equip Uganda is assisting Enid and her family in holding a 1-week HIV Hope Conference at her place for twenty pastors from around Uganda in January.  Her building and grounds make great use of rain, as she has every roof collecting the rain water in large containers.  She has solar power for her house and buildings, although the solar is not currently working in the conference building.  She hopes to add electrical power to the conference building before the January HIV conference.

We ate dinner, talked by candlelight and slept in the conference building.  The IMG_6453meal consisted of rice, potatoes, peas cooked with sausage, chapatti (flat) bread, g-nut (peanut) sauce, eggplant and cabbage.  It was delicious.

IMG_6456

Conversation by candlelight.

We rigged up mosquito nets for the night – I used some rope, chairs and the vehicle’s jumper cables suspended from the upper beam of the building to hold the nets up.  It’s amazing to see how God prepared our children for the Uganda experience.  They did not complain and seemed to enjoy the trip.  After visiting Enid’s clinic Saturday morning (I’ll post more pictures Monday or Tuesday), it took us about five hours to travel back to Jinja from Kampala in the heat due to traffic and construction, a trip that should take about three hours.  I ended up with a severe headache Saturday night, probably due to not drinking enough water.

IMG_6450

Conference Room has beautiful paintings in it. The most dramatic is the one of Jesus “Calming the Sea.”

Overall an enlightening experience with great hosts.  More photos tomorrow or Tuesday.

Prayer requests:  for the

* HIV Hope Seminar / Conference in January;

* Strength for Enid as she cares for her family and cares for others in the community;

* For the patients, many of whom have HIV – for hope, for the power of Jesus to minister to each of their individual needs, for encouragement, for peace, for healing.  Enid sees many young girls pregnant, too.  A young Ugandan man told me a couple weeks ago one of the biggest problems in Jinja for prostitution is the boda boda (motorcycle) drivers who carry passengers around town.  Girls who cannot pay with money are solicited for sex as payment.

* For getting power to the buildings before the pastors’ conference.

Thank you for your prayers and support!

Week of November 11 2013

This past week Joshua and I visited a home cell Bible study in a local community where there is a large concentration of non-Christians.  A new church plant started in this community that is distantly connected with Francis Chan’s church.  We met on the front landing of a lady’s home.  She smiles often and shares her gift of hospitality.  Our time of worship begins with a welcome from an older teen who lost both his parents in the last few weeks.  Death is a harsh reality in Uganda.  After the welcome, he asks one of the ladies to lead in singing.  There are no instruments, so she sings and claps with joy and a smile.  We all join in, a song in English and one in Luganda, while another one or two locals provide an offbeat clap to give some variety and rhythm.  A few small children from the community who are passing by and watching with much interest, begin to dance.  I love the ability of the Ugandan people to worship and sing joyfully without instruments.

After singing, we prayed, and I led the Bible study.  One of the leaders of the church translated for me.  As we wrapped up and were leaving, the sun settled over the western Africa horizon.  Joshua seemed to enjoy the time there, so as we traveled back home I asked him what he thought.  I was expecting him to politely request to stay home next time, which would have been OK.  But he said he really enjoyed it.  The locals make you feel welcomed and appreciate that we are learning their language.  A new home cell group starts this week in the same area!

English Class

Three weeks ago I started teaching English at a local seminary on a

Equipping Pastors in English

Equipping Pastors in English

volunteer basis to almost twenty pastors.  The opportunity presented itself and after speaking with my supervisor, it seemed clear that this opportunity matched the goals of our mission agency, Equip Uganda, in equipping locals.  These pastors come from various east Africa countries.  They take about twenty-three English sessions, while they work toward their theological degree.  I taught one of the twenty-three English sessions for 1½ hours a day, six days a week, for IMG_6391three weeks.  It was enjoyable.  Alexis visited the class to snap a few photos.

As this week begins and as the Spirit reminds you, would you be so kind as to pray for Alexis?  She has had some pain with her teeth moving as two wisdom teeth have formed, but not yet erupted through the gum.  So we had a dentist from the States, who is visiting Jinja, look at Alexis’s teeth.  Because it would involve surgery, he recommended another dentist that he would personally use. This dentist has a great reputation with missionaries.  So we plan to see that dentist this week about extracting her two wisdom teeth.

Wises Update – November 3rd

Just a brief update since most of you received our October newsletter last week.  This past Tuesday, I began teaching English to 18 local pastors at Uganda Baptist Seminary.  This is a 3-week course (like the 3-week course I taught at Western Youth in Morganton for 2 years), but these folks are so friendly – and humble, with an interest in learning.  The class is 6 days a week for 1 1/2 hours.  This gives me an opportunity to teach, which I enjoy doing.

I also visited a newly planted church today in a nearby small town.  This was its 3rd Sunday and a young man was saved.  You should see the smile on his face.  He is going to change his name to a Christian name.

Eclipse

Total (almost total) solar eclipse in Africa today at 5:22 pm (9:22 am EST). Photo by Jen Recotta Photography (Jen is a friend of ours who attends our Home Bible studies)!

Just before the church began, nearly 60 people made decisions to accept Jesus in a highly concentrated non-Christian area.  I thought this may be a good opportunity for discipleship to new believers, so I visited.  The leadership there seem capable.  So we’ll see how it goes.

Eclipse Lookers

Tamara Boone with the kids looking at the total solar eclipse through x-rays (thanks to Anna & Patrick). Photo by Jen Recotta Photography. Thanks!

Finally after our Sunday afternoon Bible study this evening we got to watch a total solar eclipse from about 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  That was neat.  The last one I remember seeing was the summer (June) of 1984 about 11 am in Morganton, NC.  That day I never dreamed my family and I would be living in Africa nearly 30 years later.  God sees things much differently than we do and leads us in ways we do not expect – all for His glory.  Take some time to see what He wants you to do.

Building Blocks of the Kingdom

On Friday (25th), we completed six months here in Uganda!

This past summer I was invited by a local pastor (Jabel) to share a devotion with about 20 or so pastors here in the Jinja area at their monthly micro-finance meeting.  The presentation is just over an hour.  The pastors are giving great Building Blocksfeedback and I enjoy this kind of teaching and interaction.  They seem to enjoy it, too.

The topic I was led to present is what I call, “Essential Building Blocks of the Kingdom” – laying the foundation of a life structure with the purpose of glorifying God; Jesus being the chief cornerstone.  Since July we have covered the weightier, foundational topics of truth, trust, stewardship and this past week, humility (not an easy one).  We plan to continue with other key topics, too.

Something I learned during the humility presentation was, “Distance ourselves from our daily practice of religion by turning our hearts (a cup and vessel empty and void) to the Lord Jesus that He may secure His presence, His fullness in our lives by abiding in and yielding to Him.  Then, and only then, will the world begin to see God.”

Tomorrow is a Bible study for young college-age men and administrative work for Equip.

A couple other discipleship opportunities have opened up this past week, which I may be able to share later on.  Brittany joined our church’s worship team, and she is enjoying that ministry.  Your prayers for safety and protection for our Equip team are much appreciated.

This Past Week

Your prayers are important and we thank God and you for them.  Our Equip team seemed to be under attack for a few days last weekend and Monday.  Michelle got sick about 3:30 am last Sunday morning and as a caution we kept her in the hospital for one night, then fellow team members had their house broken into while they were at church, another team member had trouble with an incision that just would not heal and got infected, and by God’s grace on Monday as I was taking the vehicle we are using into the garage, a ball bearing went out about 100 yards from the garage.  Had I been on the open road when the ball bearing when out at a high rate of speed about 10 minutes earlier, I would have had a very serious accident.

We’re so thankful for your prayers, especially as more ministry opens up and as we stand up for the name and person of Jesus Christ – that name in whom the Gentiles trust!  The enemy loves to get us focused on anything else besides Jesus, because He is the power of God to salvation (1 Cor 1:24; Rom 1:16).

If Satan can get us focused on our failure, on the peripheral shadows and not the substance, on our problems, on our obedience, on him the devil, or any other thing, he has had some success.  Unveil the enemy by exposing the light of Jesus Christ.  Look to Jesus, the source of our strength.  Abide in Him.  As one song entitled, (click on link to open in a new window and listen) “The More I Seek You” puts it,

“The more I seek You;

The more I find You;

The more I find You;

The more I love You.”

“I want to sit at Your feet;

Drink from the cup in Your hand;

Lay back against You and breathe,

Feel Your heart beat.

This love is so deep,

It’s more than I can stand.

I melt in Your peace,

It’s overwhelming.”

This is the love of Christ – seeking Him, not His blessings; not His gifts.  This is intimacy.  This is sitting at a meal with our Savior, sharing our deepest thoughts, listening to Him and then going out and letting the oppressed go free, breaking every yoke, sharing our bread with the hungry, bringing in the homeless, covering the naked, and not hiding ourselves from our own flesh (Isa 58:6-7).IMG_6149

Look at how the apostle Paul describes the minds of those who are perishing, “whose minds the god of this age (Satan) has blinded, who do not believe, lest the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ…should shine on them” (2 Cor 4:4).

That Gospel is not the gospel of Jesus’ Kingdom, it’s the very Gospel preached during this age of the church that is the Gospel of salvation in Jesus Christ by grace.

Ask yourself this question, if God would give you a world with no fighting, a world with no problems, a world with no tears, a world with no pain, with no sickness and all your needs satisfied, yet Jesus would not be there.  Would you want to be there?

Your answer reveals how much you love Jesus and how much you love His gifts and blessings.  Which (or better, Who) do you desire most?

From Samuel: “How to Keep Your Faith in Time of Tragedy”

Regular blog readers here know about Samuel (see May 2013 Archives for the full story).  Samuel is a young pastor in Jinja who lost both his parents this past summer.  His mom and dad were brutally attacked during a break-in of their home back in May.  His father died that night and his mother lived for about two months and then she died.

I meet with Samuel weekly.  He does most of the talking when we meet.  Though hurt, his faith and confidence have been strong through these last few months.  I asked if he would be willing to write out his thoughts about how to keep faith in time of tragedy.  I will type his notes as he wrote them to me.  Here’s Samuel:

Why I lost my Dad in a murder by our own relatives inside the house at night on Saturday, May 11th 2013.  It was a horrible thing I have ever heard, and it was unbelievable at that time.  As I started to panic a lot but as soon as possible I realize my weakness by that time, then I rush with no words, kneeling down, and I ask God, please this is not normal God you know, but I need your strength and comfort.

But still there’s a lot of panic, and I started to speak of God’s attributes – e.g. God’s all powerful, all knowing, all wisdom, is Almighty God is loving, etc. and I started to gain my strength and sense by letting the Scripture speak to me more than my feeling – e.g. Psalm 139:1-6; 91:1; etc. which is the hardest thing to do at that moment.  But I have to accept the Scripture to tell me what to do, not my feeling.

And there I found my self encouraged and continue to stand on the ground still loving God and thanking God for all had happened.

So I had to overcome the fear, worry and the feeling of tragedy by seeing God through it, that nothing happens by mistake without God’s knowing.  Romans 8:27-30.

A month after my mother was also badly hurt in the night of the murder of my Dad, she also died and I had see my self standing on open ground of no one along side me.  Both have gone, who I had loved them so much because the truth is ever since I was born now 28 years of age my dad has never beaten me once [Note from Mark: parents beating, caning and even burning or cutting children as punishment is too common in Uganda].  And they were part of my life every day I live.

Really I have loved them to see the fruit of their labor on me but God in his plan did not allow what seem right in his sight to be done, for he is God, and in my mother’s death accepted God’s will to be done, but letting him be first in everything good or bad (Colossians 1:18).  Never won’t I allowed to be threaten by any storm (Psalm 23).  God is God.  I will trust him.

What encourages me is that my parents died Christians (born again) and they will continue living in Christ and one day God’s will shall I see them again.  Life is not [about] flesh that has died and rotten by our soul and spirit that no man has power over them except the author, our Lord God (Genesis 2:7).

So I overcome or deal with the tragedy of losing my two parents by:

– accepting God in all situations;

– letting God control every step;

– allowing God’s word to speak to me by telling me what to do in every situation, not feelings;

– running before the throne of God of mercy and love for comfort and encouragement, wisdom and victory over every situation.

The devil will use your weakness to put you down but God will use your weakness to lift you up in Grace and Mercy.  Be wise in time of any tragedy by having God’s mind (scriptures) for the devil is so close to you at that moment of tragedy (temptation, test), but remember the good LORD will never leave the situation beyond your strength (1 John 1:10).

Nothing shall obstruct me from the love of God (Romans 8:31-39).

Glory be God our Father in Jesus.

Samuel’s faith strengthens my faith in the Lord, and I trust his faith strengthened your faith as well.  God’s word supports us.  Thanks for reading.